AUTOMATICA MUNICH 2016: MRC - Footage

ID

437232

DESCRIPTION
Edited Package
SHOTLIST
1. BOSCH
2. APAS implementing components in frames
3. Robot and employee working togethert
4. General shots robot working
5. Robot stopps when employee gets too close
6. Interview Peter Jörg, Work Scheduler Robert Bosch GmbH (German transcribed/translated):
“At first, the staff was a bit sceptical of the robots, because they were afraid of losing their jobs. Now they have realized that they just support them with their activities, and they take a huge load off them so they can get on with more important tasks.”
7. Interview Wolfgang Pomrehn, Dipl.-Ing., Product Manager Robert Bosch GmbH, (German transcribed/translated):
“As a collaborative robot, it notices if a person gets too close. It stops and when the person leaves the danger area the robot starts to move again. This means that humans and machines can work hand in hand.”
8. Interview Wolfgang Pomrehn, Dipl.-Ing., Product Manager Robert Bosch GmbH, (German transcribed/translated):
“There are already these so-called co-bots, the collaborative robots, at numerous Bosch plants, always where currently boring, monotonous activities can be taken over by robots. For example at the end of a (production) line for packaging parts or inserting parts into machines.”

9. KUKA felxFELLOW Assembly Assistant (collaborative robot)
10. Interview Dr. Ulrich Walwei, Vice Director Institute for Emplyment Research, (German transcribed/translated):
“The human-robot collaboration will not eliminate the workers. Robots will help with the daily grind at work, and will basically assist people.”
11. Interview Jürgen Wechsler, District Manager IG Metall Bayern (Labour Union), (German transcribed/translated):
“But routine activities will be lost, yet more sophisticated tasks will appear. At that point the magic word will be "Change through education, through qualifications (skills)"... that will be the big challenge.”
12. Interview Prof. Dr. Julian Nida-Rümelin, Professor for Philosophy and Political Theory, University of Munich (LMU), (German transcribed/translated):
“We have had automation for many decades, actually already for more than a century. The previous activities in the industry, on the assembly line, for example, have been mostly already replaced by robots or by automated production methods. But that doesn't change the basic findings: people aren’t losing work because of this. One sees this in the history of the industry.”

13. Interview Prof. Dr. Julian Nida-Rümelin, Professor for Philosophy and Political Theory, University of Munich (LMU), (German transcribed/translated):
“In the ideal world, this will unleash creativity and intelligence and more possibilities for communication to concentrate on the more important things. In the worst case, humans will be exploited and become a source for data gathering frenzy. These are the two extremes. Which will happen? Probably one in between. But we can’t predict.”
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